10.18.2011

Tasty Tuesday - What Is A Prey Model Raw Diet?

Hi, everyone ... it's me, Phoebe! Tucker is taking TASTY TUESDAY off so I am here with Mom to talk to you about what Mom calls a Prey Model Raw Diet.  I don't know why she calls it that really.  We just call it dinner!  (And in the case of the cat kids, breakfast as well, because they eat twice a day and we only eat once a day.  Speaking of which ... does that seem unfair to any of the rest of you?  I asked Tucker and he said that's just how it is.  That's why we get cookies in the morning and the cats don't.  But I guess cookies for breakfast is pretty good.  Ok, then I guess I won't get mad at Mom.)   



Oh, er ... hi, Mom!  There you are!  I was just telling everyone how much I love you!  I guess the floor's all yours! 

 Me, thinking about dinner!  
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks, Pheebs!  Hi, everyone! On this Tasty Tuesday, kindly hosted by Kolchak of Kol's Notes and Sugar the Golden Retriever, I'd like to talk briefly about a PREY MODEL RAW DIET.  In a nutshell,  a prey model raw diet is comprised of three main elements:  muscle meat, organ meat, and bone.  If I'd better prepared for this, I could have taken pictures to better illustrate, but not only am I a poor planner, I wasn't entirely sure about how anyone would feel about seeing pictures of a bunch of raw meat.  I don't happen to be squeamish about it, though even after many many years of raw feeding I still don't really like handling raw liver, but I know some people are, so it's probably a good thing in that respect.

Depending upon how this initial post is received, I can talk in subsequent Tasty Tuesday posts about exactly which cuts of meat fall into which category, but in a nutshell, in a prey model raw diet, 80% of the diet is muscle meat (which also includes things like hearts, gizzards, etc.), 10% is edible bone (which can vary depending upon the size of your dog, but for Tucker & Phoebe basically works out to various types of poultry bones), 5% is liver, and 5% is other organ meat such as kidney.  Some raw feeders do a modified version of raw, called BARF (I know, sounds gross!) whereby raw pulped veggies and fruits are included in the diet. If you're interested in what sorts of veggies and fruits you might include in the diet if you were going to fed the BARF method (which stands for biologically appropriate raw food OR bones and raw food, depending upon whom you ask) I actually noticed recently when I was perusing THIS BLOG  that Jennifer at NEVER SAY NEVER GREYHOUNDS had some great blog posts, with pictures, for various recipes of what she called SLOP (Superior Life Optimizing Pudding).  An example of one such post is HERE. 

I actually used to feed the BARF method, but a couple years in, I discovered the prey model method, and not only does it make more sense to me - it's a lot easier!  So it's a win-win.  However, I do include in the diet small amounts of green tripe (usually raw which I obtain from a raw feeding supplier) or canned (such as Tripett) if I happen to run out.  Green tripe is the stomach and contents of ruminant animals (sheep, deer, goats, etc.) and it basically takes the place of any vegetable matter in the diet, as well as being more bio-available to the body than whole raw, or even pulped or cooked, vegetables.  Additionally, it has a perfect one to one calcium to phosphorous ratio, which is something you must always keep in mind when feeding a raw diet.  

Below is a monthly menu plan for Tucker & Phoebe.  Please keep in mind that this diet includes a lot of variety and is meant to be fed to dogs that are already accustomed to raw feeding.  Giving this much variety to a dog who had not had raw food before would be a good way to spend a lot of time mopping your floor, if you get my drift.  Newbie raw dogs are started on a lot of bone in chicken, as they typically need the stool firming qualities of the bone to offset the richness of the meat.  And you absolutely DO NOT want to give a newbie raw dog any organ meat, again due to the high likelihood of stomach upset.  Frankly, the biggest mistake a lot of people make when switching their dogs to a raw diet is that they try to move too fast and don't give their dogs time to adjust to the new diet.  The same can be true of cats, I suppose, although cats generally present a different challenge in that they are so finicky and reluctant to try new things that the biggest hurdle can be actually getting them to try the raw food.  More on that in subsequent posts (again depending upon how well, or not, this one is received.)



Sunday

Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday

Week 1

Beef liver, sardines, & a chicken foot


Boneless sirloin


Turkey wing


Boneless sirloin


Pork kidney



Lamb tongue


Bone-in chicken breast & tripe




Week 2
Lamb liver, canned salmon (packed in water), & a chicken foot



Duck hearts


Bone-in rabbit 


Goat RMB (non-edible bone – bone will be taken away when meat Is gone)


Beef kidney




Remainder of Wednesday’s goat RMB (if any – if not, some kind of boneless red meat – beef, lamb, etc.)


Bone-in rabbit & tripe


Week 3
Pork liver, sardines, & a chicken foot


Chicken hearts/gizzards


Whole dressed quail 
Bone-in lamb shank with non-edible bone (bone is taken away when meat is stripped)

Lamb kidney




Remainder of Wednesday’s lamb shank (if any – if not, some kind of boneless red meat – beef, lamb, etc.)



Bone-in rabbit & tripe


Week 4
Chicken liver, canned salmon (packed in water), & a chicken foot


Lamb heart








Beef tongue








Ground bison






Pork kidney








Beef gullet 

Bone-in Cornish hen drum & tripe







Here is a sample monthly menu for the cats:  



Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Week 1

Chicken gizzards/hearts  (served at both meals)

AM:
Cornish hen (meat/bone)

PM: 
Cornish hen (meat) + chicken liver


AM:
Beef tongue

PM: 
Boneless chicken (usually chunks of breast or boneless thigh)

AM: 
Bone-in chicken

PM: 
Ground bison

AM:
Finely ground beef tripe 

PM: 
Chunks of beef (stew meat, sirloin)

AM:
Rabbit  (meat/bone)

PM: 
Rabbit (meat) + beef kidney

 AM:
Chunks of boneless pork

PM:
Ground bison
Week 2

AM: 
Beef heart and boneless chicken breast 

PM: 
Turkey hearts

Roughly 5.5 ounce whole dressed quail (from Hare Today) cut in half with kitchen shears – half for breakfast, half for dinner

** This is essentially a whole prey item, minus feathers, head, beak, and feet, and contains all components of the raw diet:  meat, edible bone, and organ


Chicken gizzards/hearts
(served at both meals)

AM: 
Bone-in duck 

PM: 
Ground lamb

AM:
Chunks of boneless chicken breast

PM:
Lamb heart

AM:
Cornish hen (meat/bone)

PM: 
Cornish hen (meat) + lamb kidney


AM:
Finely ground beef tripe 

PM: 
Chunks of boneless chicken breast
Week 3

AM: 
Ground boneless turkey thighs 

PM:
Duck hearts

AM: Rabbit  (meat/bone)






PM:  Rabbit (meat) + pork liver 

AM:
Boneless beef (sirloin, stew meat, whatever)



PM:
Lamb heart

AM: 
Bone-in rabbit 





PM: 
Chunks of boneless ostrich steak

Chicken gizzards/hearts (served at both meals)

AM:
Pheasant (meat/bone)





PM: 
Pheasant  (meat) + beef kidney

AM:
Finely ground beef tripe 



PM: 
Ground turkey
Week 4

AM:
Pork heart

PM:
Beef lung
(this is one of those “sounds like an organ but it’s really meat” items)


AM: 
Turkey thighs (meat/bone)

PM:
Turkey (meat) + chicken liver




Ground goat (boneless, served at both meals)


AM: 
Bone-in duck 

PM: 
Ground bison or lamb


AM:
Finely ground beef tripe 


PM: 
Chunks of boneless turkey thighs

AM:
Duck (meat/bone)

PM:  Duck breast (meat) + beef spleen

Chicken gizzards/hearts (served at both meals)



Again, this is just a brief overview of what a prey model raw diet can comprise.  The great part about a raw diet is that if you have a dog or a cat who is allergic to chicken or beef or whatever, you can tailor the diet to account for that.  The more variety the better, but it does not have to be as extensive as what you see above.  There's obviously a lot more to cover on this topic - because although at the root of it, the concept is very simple:  IE to provide the most species-appropriate, bio-available food to nourish our companion carnivores, the variations are almost endless, and can be discussed and debated ad nauseam among raw feeders.  I'm happy to answer any questions that anyone has, and any future posts on this topic will basically depend upon what kind of reception this one gets.

Here is the one token raw picture for this post - it's chunks of raw, bone-in pheasant with some pork liver.  This was Finn's breakfast one day.



Ok, so ... I hope I haven't completely grossed everyone out.  So what say you?  Interesting topic to delve into in future Tuesday posts or too gross to discuss ever again?  Let me know what you think!

10 comments:

Kolchak Puggle said...

What an AWESOME post! We've been eating raw for a couple months now (Mama mixes BARF and prey model so you never know what we'll get from day to day!) We have to say, we have NEVER looked or felt better. And we really love, so much better than kibbles!

K-Koira said...

My dogs and cat have been getting prey model raw since January, and have been doing really good on it. Only a few differences from my normal menus and yours- I don't feed any ground meat, at all, unless I received it for free (generally from someone cleaning out a freezer); I don't feed anything cooked (canned salmon is by definition cooked salmon); My cat eats hunks of meat the size of her full meal, as I feel no need to chop it up smaller, since she has teeth to do that for herself.

And, I have a smallish freezer. Which means, while my dogs get a good amount of variety, I tend feed through 1-2 types of meat at a time, then feed through a different type, as available, rather than feeding different types all through the week like you do. Both work, but my way works better for my limited freezer space (and so far, no complaints from the dogs!)

Spitty-the-Kitty said...

Well, I am sure this would probably be good for me, and I think it looks pretty tasty, but I have a feeling my Human would not put this much effort into feeding me. She has, however, really upped the quality of my foodz to include more low-grain or no grain dry and wet food. I wasn't very happy about that at first, and there are still some things I love that I make her buy for me that don't fit that grain-free description, but I must say she's trying harder.

I think that food in the picture looks deelishus!

Tucker The Crestie said...

Phew! I'm glad that at least the two comments so far have been positive.

K-Koira, I meant to address ground meat in the post, but I didn't want it to get too long. Generally I don't feed much, if any, ground meat, and haven't fed any in recent months due to all the issues with store bought ground meat. Also, the menus that I posted are not fed month in and month out - it was intended just as a sample and was one that I provided to the holistic vet I'm now using when I engaged her help last year. I change it up all the time.

♥♥♥ The OP Pack ♥♥♥ said...

Very interesting post. Mom has heard a lot about the BARF diet, but not this one. It does gross her out a bit to think about all that raw stuff, but she does understand its value. We would be interested in seeing more posts on the topic.

Woos ~ Phantom, Thunder, Ciara, and Lightning

Amber DaWeenie said...

I guess I'm like a lot of others....I HATE handling raw meat. I would do it in a heartbeat if there was a case of one of the dogs needing a completely raw diet, but I offered a couple of them cuttings from a piece of chicken breast and they looked at me like....."are you kidding? Cook it first, please". Guess these dogs are just spoiled rotten. They'll all down a bowl of kibble in 5 minutes or less, but raw chicken, forget it!

Tucker The Crestie said...

Haha, Amber! I have heard of the occasional dog that doesn't take to raw. And I am sure (actually I know) that if they had their druthers, all of them, especially the cats, would prefer to have their meat cooked. But cooking the meat changes the whole game and then other things have to be added to balance it. I am very confident in my ability to provide a balanced raw diet. Cooked - not so much. I know I could do it, and I would if I needed to, but I would want to consult a veterinary nutritionist first. (But they still do get occasional bites of cooked meat as a treat.)

Julie said...

Wow, this is really interesting! I admit to being totally ignorant about the raw diet but I have been interested in learning more about the options. I am interested to learn more about this prey diet and would look forward to reading your posts if you want to share more about it!

And I have to say that, as always, the pic of Phoebe totally made me laugh, so cute!

Sugar the Golden Retriever said...

Woof! Woof! Golden Hello! Belated Tasty Tuesday! great n interesting post. I am on a diet too ... but simply less dog treats/regular doggie food. I only tried once eating a raw treat ... I have a very sensitive stomach so did not work for me. It is always wonderful to read other dog's diet. Golden Thanks for sharing. Lots of Golden Woofs, Sugar

Greyhounds CAN Sit said...

This is so interesting. I'm amazed at the raw foods you can get to feed dogs in the US. We are very limited unless you know a hunter! Chicken feet, rabbit, pork liver, kidney, whole dressed quail, cornish hen, heck they're not in the shops for people, lol!

I'm happy to read more about it even if I can't get the foods you mention:) Frankie and Beryl do get a lot of raw meat but obviously not the variety you can provide.